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Shop Address: 52 Francis Street, Dublin 8, Ireland
Phone Number: 01 - 473 3399
Email address: howardantiques@gmail.com



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863. Superb System Walking Stick by Swaine Adeney 19thCt

863. Superb System Walking Stick by Swaine Adeney 19thCt

SUBERB SWAINE & ADENEY SYSTEM CANE LATE 19th CENTURY

An Unusual and Possibly Quite Rare System Gentleman's Walking Stick by world famous makers Swaine & Adeney, mid to late Nineteenth Century.

The dark Sheperd’s horn crook handle with a deep silver plated collar with a mechanism to make this exceptional piece into a resting support. Complete with its original horn ferrule

Condition: Good condition, nice surface patination to shaft and a few scratches. This Stick is quite heavy, most suitable for a Gentleman.

Length: 35.25” (89.5cm).  Width: (at handle) 5.25” (13.5cm).

Shipped to Barnstable, North Devon, England.

Swaine Adeney History:

In 1750, John Ross founded a Whip making business at 238 Piccadilly, London

James Swaine later purchased this business in 1798, having for some years been foreman of a successful whip making business in Holborn.

A royal appointment to His Majesty King George III and to his sons, The Prince of Wales and the Dukes of York, Clarence, Kent, Cumberland and Cambridge quickly followed and Swaine Adeney’s reputation for quality and excellence was established.

The Royal appointments were renewed in the reigns of His Majesty George IV and His Majesty William IV. In the year 1835, James Swaine moved his business to larger premises at 185 Piccadilly. The business continued to flourish and in 1845 Edward Swaine took his nephew into partnership and Swaine Adeney was born.

In many ways, much remains the same today, the same artisan’s crafts are used to hand-shape the fine leather goods: tooling, stitching and engraving each piece in time-honoured tradition.

In 1851, Swayne Adeney decided to put its fine products on show to the world at the London Exhibition held at the newly constructed Crystal Palace. The Exhibition was the largest the world had ever seen (attracting over six million visitors to a space four times the size of St. Peter’s in Rome).